Diving & Snorkelling

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With thousands of miles of coastline, sea lochs bursting with wildlife, unspoilt natural reefs and an abundance of easily accessible shipwrecks, Argyll and the Isles is something of a mecca for sport diving enthusiasts. Argyll has some of the clearest waters in Scotland and there are hundreds of drift, shallow, scenic and shore-dive sites. The area’s well-established dive operators and schools can provide instruction at all levels as well as share their first-hand knowledge of what lies beneath the waves. Argyll and the Isles is a particularly good region for learning to scuba dive, with gently sloping beaches leading to sheltered sea water. You’ll often see divers near the head of Loch Long and the eastern shore of Loch Fyne.

 

In the Firth of Lorn the huge sea cliffs of uninhabited islands plunge into clear oceanic waters. The Hispania is one of the most dived wrecks in Scotland. This cargo steamship sank in 1954 in the Sound of Mull, and today the wreck sits in around 30 metres of water and is almost completely carpeted in sealife. Oban is a perfect destination for wintry scuba diving adventures, given the sheltered waters and easily accessible dive sites. One of the most well known of these is the shipwreck of the SS Breda. You’ll find hundreds of other drift, shallow, scenic and shore-dive sites, from the Atlantic Pinnacles around the Torran Rocks near Iona to the gullies and walls of the Garvellachs and Grey Rocks. The area’s well-established dive operators and schools can provide instruction at all levels as well as share their first-hand knowledge of dive sites.